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en2.4:hazards

Hazards

Exhaustion

When a character is performing prolonged strenuous activity, the circumstances could call for a Constitution roll. Strenuous activity could be carrying a heavy bag up a hill or brawling in a bar. It also includes being ready for battle for several minutes, weapon raised and looking for hidden enemies.

When such a roll fails, the character becomes tired, which manifests as Stun damage. If the character is already Stunned, whatever the source may be, the Stun Threshold is increased one level: Minor becomes Moderate, Severe becomes Critical, and so on. If the endeavors are particularly taxing or time-consuming, the GM should apply penalties to the rolls.

If the character got tired from just minutes of effort, exhaustion can be cleared with a successful Constitution roll, with wound penalties. One attempt per second is allowed, just like with any other Stun damage. However, if the character became tired after hours of effort, each attempt to shake the exhaustion takes one minute.

Falling

Damage from falling inflicts both Stun and Injury damage. The base damage is set by the height, and then modified by the surface the character lands on, as well as the success of the Agility roll. When all modifications are made, roll the damage.

Fall Damage
2m17
5m26
10m33
20m40
50m50
100m+57

Note that fall damage does not increase beyond 100m. This is because the speed of the fall does not increase past that distance. Falling does not need to overcome the armor's Protection levels to cause damage, but if the character is wearing at least a vest and a helmet, armor may reduce the damage (See below).

Surface
-10 water (>3m)
-5 snow (>1m)
-2 slope (>45°)
+0 sand or dirt (with or without grass)
+2 Hard, flat surface (metal, concrete, asphalt)
+5 Hard, rough surface (large rocks, cliffs)
Agility and armor
- the Success rate of the Agility-check
-2 wearing armor that covers torso and head

Example: Thomas, Agility 7, misses a jump between two buildings, and falls 20m (damage 40). He lands on asphalt, which increases the damage to 40+2 = 42. His Agility roll is 4 and 16: a success of 4. This reduces the damage to 42-4 = 38. The damage roll turns up Black 4, White 12: Injury 24, Stun 32.

Toxins

A toxin is described by ROA (Route of Administration), Potency, Delay and Effect. The ROA could be Absorbed (through the skin), Enteral (eaten or imbibed), Injected or Inhaled. Potency determines how likely the subject is to be affected. Delay is how long it takes for the toxin to work. If no other unit is written, it is in seconds. The Effect could be simple damage for many types of poison, or a more elaborately described consequence.

When a character is exposed to a toxin, roll its Potency, using the subject's Toughness as the Passive.

  • If the roll has no success that is higher than Toughness, the subject suffers a very lenient version of the toxin's effect, and after twice the Delay. Stun and Injury are reduced by -10.
  • If the roll has one success that is higher than Toughness, Injury and Stun are reduced by -5. Other effects and their durations are halved, when applicable.
  • If the roll has 2 Successes, and the highest beats Toughness (a Full Hit), the subject suffers the full effects of the toxin.

Example: A professor of archaeology with Toughness 8 is hit by a poisoned dart, delivering one dose of an Injected Potency 15 Neural toxin with a Delay of 20s (seconds). Its effects are 35 Stun damage for 2h (two hours). The roll is 10 and 17. One success is above the Passive. The Stun is reduced to 30, and the duration to one hour. The Stun die turns up 8. Since 20 can be added to 8 without exceeding 30, the Stun damage is 28. This is more than the archaeologist's Severe Threshold, so in 20 seconds he will pass out for one hour.

Increasing or reducing the dose affects the Potency:

Dose Potency
x10 +10
x5 +5
x2 +2
/2 -2
/5 -5
/10 -10

If an Absorbed or Injected toxin is used to coat a weapon, only a single dose can be administered in an attack. The first successful attack uses up the toxin.

Disease

A disease is described by Transmission, Infectivity, Latency and Symptoms. Transmission could be, for example: Contact (touch), Oral (through food or drinking water), Vector (carried by an animal), or Airborne. Infectivity measures the likelihood of infection. Latency is the time between infection and the sign of the first Symtoms. The Symptoms, in this context, are the effects of the disease.

When a character is exposed to a disease, roll its Infectivity, using the subject's Constitution as Passive.

  • If the roll has no success that is higher than Constitution , the subject suffers a very lenient version of the Symptoms, and after twice the Latency. Stun and Injury are reduced by -10.
  • If the roll has one success that is higher than Constitution, the Symptoms and their durations are halved, when applicable. Stun and Injury are reduced by -5.
  • If the roll has 2 Successes, and the highest beats Constitution (a Full Hit), the subject suffers the full Symptoms of the disease.

The Infectivity of the disease should be modified in accordance with the characters' exposure to the pathogen (did they wade through the infected river, or did they drink from it?) as well as their counter-measures (e.g. good personal hygiene against Contact-transmitted disease, mosquito nets against malaria, and the like).

en2.4/hazards.txt · Last modified: 2010/09/04 15:31 (external edit)